• An athletic trainer wrapping a football player's foot

    Posted 3/10/2022

    Sports medicine’s health care specialists on and off the field

    You’ve seen them hustling across the football field or crouching beside a player on the sideline whose face is twisted in pain.

    They don’t wear the black and white stripes of the referee, but their breed is just as easy to spot. And their presence on the field can be just as critical as a game-changing field goal, free throw or hat trick.

    Enter the athletic trainer, or AT.

    Often sporting khaki pants, a fanny pack and a polo or sports shirt in team colors, ATs are recognizable in how they look and, more importantly, for what they do.

    But if in your mind’s eye you picture an NFL or NBA game, it might surprise you to know the diverse places where ATs work.

    With March being National Athletic Training Month, we want to recognize ATs as vital practitioners of health care. This year, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) is celebrating the theme “Providing Health Care Everywhere.”

    The theme broadly promotes ATs whose profession centers on injury prevention, treatment and ongoing wellness management. And while most often associated with sports, ATs work as health care professionals in many settings beyond the playing field.

    Beyond just athletics

    There’s high regard for the public work that athletic trainers do in helping individuals avoid injury and recover from injury.

    Not surprising, then, are the national standards that trainers are held to.

    ATs must graduate with a bachelors or master’s degree and pass the Board of Certification Exam (BOC) to work with professional athletes. There’s also regular renewals on that certification to demonstrate continued learning and competence.

    All this is to ensure that athletes are healthy and performing at their peak potential.

    But think about the word “athlete.” You may think of athletics in a traditional sense – youth and high school programs to college and professional divisions – on the playing field, ice rink, basketball court, you name it.

    But ATs do their work in many job settings and treat a range of individuals beyond those traditional venues, such as:

    • Doctors’ offices
    • Hospitals and emergency rooms
    • Urgent Care centers
    • Rehabilitation clinics

    Outside of clinical settings, there are emerging job settings where ATs are finding new opportunities in public safety, military schools and the armed forces, performing arts and aeronautics. These industries employ individuals who need certain levels of athletic fitness to do their jobs.

    Add to those, various commercial settings like airlines, warehouses, hotel/resort and theme parks, and an athletic trainer’s scope of practice broadens even more.

    For each of these sectors ATs are required to have specific training to provide medical care based on the unique activities, physical demands and requirements of the patients they treat.
    No matter the type of athlete or athletic patient or the job environment, ATs work as an extension of and overall medical team.

    Let’s break it down by key areas of an athletic trainer’s role.

    Injury prevention

    Injuries are a part of life.

    But if you’re an athlete or a weekend warrior, or you have a very active or physical job, you likely have more instances of injury than someone who’s not as active.

    If you’ve been sidelined from work, missed out hanging with friends or playing your sport because of injury – or a repeated injury – there’s good news.
    Working with an AT now can help avoid injury later. Put another way, you don’t have to wait until you’re injured to address the issue. 
    Your AT can identify any weaknesses or conditions that may be leading to your injuries and plan preventive measures to correct them.

    Called prehab, preventive tactics are designed to decrease your risk of future injury.

    • Functional movement screen. Done by an athletic trainer to identify dysfunctional or painful movement patterns. Exercises are prescribed to correct movement and any imbalances you may have acquired in compensating for pain. Exercises can be done on their own or as part of your warm-up before activity. For example, a proper warm-up using dynamic stretching can help increase blood flow to loosen your muscles prior to your activity, whether it’s working out or warming up before performing a concert or dance routine.
    • Recovery planning. Proper nutrition, hydration and sleep are all needed to keep the body in the right state for exercise. But it takes planning and adaptation to adopt the right approach for your body and your activity level. Your AT can advise on the right balance for your wellness. This advanced planning helps produce optimal performance through brain to body communication. So get good sleep, stay nourished and hydrated and warm-up!

    Post-injury. Return to play. Return to work.

    The moment has finally come.

    You sustained an injury (ouch!).

    You completed the recovery process (hooray!)

    What comes next?

    The next stage in post-injury progression is your return – return to play (RTP) or return to work.

    This happens after your medical care provider is satisfied with your progress and clears you to get back to sports and physical activities. Working with an athletic trainer is essential in getting to this stage.

    Your AT has done functional tests and collected performance stats to gauge your readiness for activity, at what level and at what pace.

    For athletes, and depending on the injury, tests can include sprints, cutting drills and jumps for lower body injuries, or lifting movements such as throwing and push-pulling for upper body injuries. 

    ATs use the stats to pinpoint any deficits remaining post-injury recovery, like limping or weakness, which could hinder you from safely retuning to play.

    If testing is clear of any concerns, you’ll get the green light to return to full activity.

    If there are areas of concerns, your trainer may plan additional exercises, or modify your activity level to help you improve on the deficits and continue toward full clearance.

    Return to play is unique to each athlete and injury. The goal of functional testing and injury recovery is to ensure your safety and the safety of others on the playing field when returning from an injury.

    Onsite emergency care

    Although it’s not something we like to think about, medical emergencies can happen at any moment, in any environment.

    Athletic trainers are skilled medical providers who are trained in first aid, CPR and automated external defibrillator use (AED) in the case of sudden cardiac arrest.

    With their advanced medical education, ATs are prepared to handle emergency situations that may arise, especially on the playing field.

    Whether its keeping up-to-date with the most current first aid and CPR standards, revising emergency action plans or drilling emergency situations with members of the sports medicine team, athletic trainers are usually first responders and initiate emergency medical care when injuries happen.

    There’s a tactical side to AT work, too – critical need-to-knows in the face of emergency:

    • Emergency phone numbers
    • Ambulance access points at venues
    • The integrity and working condition of onsite emergency equipment

    Partner to parents, coaches and clinical team

    If you’re an athlete, a parent, relative or friend of one, you may have crossed paths with a sports medicine team member at some point.

    This team is a group of trained individuals who care for an athlete’s health in variety of ways.

    At the center of this team is the athletic trainer.

    The athletic trainer is generally the first on the scene and tends to the immediate and long-term needs of the athlete – injury evaluation through treatment and rehabilitation. But they also rely on the support of other experts.

    Surrounding the athletic trainer are other talented individuals, often including:

    • physician
    • physical/occupational therapist
    • nutritionist
    • strength and conditioning coach
    • massage therapist
    • sports psychologist, among others.

    The athletic trainer coordinates care between each of these individuals. They also handle all communication with coaches and family members to keep everyone in the loop with the care of the athlete. This open communication is key to managing medical care and the expectations surrounding care.

    Around the world, ATs are looked to as trusted professionals playing a crucial part in health management and health care.

    Multi-skilled and holding advanced certification to help athletes, performers and patients across many job settings, athletic trainers truly do provide health care everywhere.

    By: Joshua Cramer, DAT, LAT, ATC, CSCS, CES, area sports medicine director for southeastern PA, and Katie Olenek, M.S., LAT, ATC, PES, area director of sports medicine for central PA.


  • woman playing pickleball

    Posted 2/25/2022

    How to stay in play and on the court

    What is pickleball? And why are people raving about it?

    Pickleball is an improvisation of badminton and ping-pong. The game is played on a court using a softball-sized, hard-plastic ball with holes – like a wiffle ball – and paddles similar to table-tennis paddles.

    Conceived in 1965 as a game that families could play together, pickleball grew in popularity. By 1972, a corporation was founded for the sport.

    While there is debate around the origin of its name, there is none about how fun, fast, competitive and entertaining the game is.

    With a smaller court size than its cousin sport of tennis, it’s an ideal way to stay active and fit for just about anyone.

    And pickleball has taken the country by storm.

    The first pickleball tournament was held in 1976 in Washington State. And while not what’s called an overnight sensation, the explosive growth of the game in the years since has led to pickleball courts popping up everywhere, and the formation of amateur and professional leagues.

    There’s even a professional pickleball tour.

    When injury puts you in a pickle

    With the rise in popularity of pickleball, physical therapists throughout the country are seeing an increase in injuries that are similar to those found in other racquet sports.

    New pickleball players sustain approximately 50% of injuries during their first year of play.

    The most common pickleball injuries include:

    • Pickleball elbow
    • Ankle sprains
    • Knee sprains
    • Shoulder sprains
    • Achilles tendonitis
    • Wrist fractures
    • Concussions from falls

    In the case of older players, many are predisposed to injury, often due to prior injury, limited flexibility and range of motion and deterioration of balance, or have recurrent injuries.

    So if you are looking to start playing the game … or stay in the game … keep these prevention tips in mind to reduce your risk and avoid injury:

    Warm up   Pickleball is a fast-paced game, and the excitement starts right away. So it's important that you warm up before you get on the court. Try a light 5-minute jog, a slow walk with high knees or some side shuffles to loosen up.

    Stretch   As part of your warm-up, make sure to stretch. Shoulder stretches, calf stretches, hamstring/quad stretches and wrist and neck stretches are all important to incorporate into your routine.

    Choose proper footwear   Pickleball requires moving side to side and back and forth. Choose a good fitting athletic shoe for this type of movement.

    Pivot   Similar to tennis and other racquet sports, you will be executing groundstrokes, volleys and serves. Remember to pivot your hips and shoulders as you face the approaching ball.

    If you are injured, stop playing!

    Don’t try to tough it out, especially if it is a head injury.

    Contact a physical therapist to help you heal and recover before you return to play.

    Pickleball is as fun as it sounds, and you’ll want to play for years to come.

    If you’re in a pickle with pain or injury of any sort, click now to request an appointment to find one of our centers near you.

    By: Deborah Santiago, P.T., DPT. Deborah is a physical therapist and center manager at NovaCare Rehabilitation in New Jersey. NovaCare and KORT are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.

    Select Medical is proud to be the official physical therapy partner of the PPA Tour.


  • therapist working with long COVID patient

    Posted 2/15/2022

    If you clicked to read this, it’s likely because you or someone you know has long COVID. Or maybe you’re now hearing people talk about long-lasting symptoms of COVID-19.

    With research now being published, millions of people having a COVID diagnosis will experience “long” COVID – post-COVID syndrome or long-haul COVID, earning some who experience it the nickname of “long hauler.”

    Putting aside that bit of levity, long COVID is no joke.

    So if you are struggling to read this because you’re dealing with “COVID brain fog,” you may be thinking, How did I get so unlucky?

    It’s a fair question to ask.

    But in reality, long COVID is more common than most think.

    According to Penn State College of Medicine researchers, more than half of the 236 million people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide since December 2019 will experience post-COVID symptoms.

    Months after recovering from COVID-19, millions of people are still suffering one or more debilitating symptoms like:

    • Brain fog
    • Difficulty breathing
    • Muscle weakness
    • Fatigue
    • Joint pain
    • Dizziness and more

    If you or a loved one is suffering, don’t give up. There is hope and help.

    Physical therapy is medicine for long COVID

    Professional physical therapists, like me, understand what you are going through. Indeed, if you have long COVID, physical therapy can help.

    Yes, physical therapy.

    As physical therapists, we are specialists who are trained in identifying the clinical symptoms and effects of long COVID. For example, the profound fatigue you’re feeling? Reminiscent of chronic fatigue syndrome, it’s a post-acute leftover of the viral COVID infection, and we can help.

    That joint pain? We’re trained also to understand musculoskeletal conditions that can be causing your pain. We can assess the pain and determine the appropriate treatment for it.

    I work in an outpatient physical therapy center and help treat patients with long COVID. Our parent company Select Medical collaborated with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on an important clinical study regarding the long-term impact of COVID-19.

    The study validates our Recovery and Reconditioning program which focuses on specific deficits in patients recovering from COVID-19 and other debilitating illnesses and conditions.

    Our Recovery and Reconditioning program helps, specifically, with:

    • Fatigue
    • Labored breathing
    • Weakness
    • Headache
    • Dizziness
    • Joint and muscle pain

    Our program was developed in partnership with leading physicians, infectious disease specialists, physical and occupational therapists and speech-language pathologists to help those impacted to heal, gain strength and return to an active, full lifestyle.

    We hear all the time that people suffering with long COVID don’t feel heard. Feel misunderstood. Feel like giving up.

    If that sounds like you, then trust me, we understand.

    We are proud to offer the Recovery and Reconditioning program to you, your loved ones and/or friends – anyone who may be dealing with lingering effects of having COVID-19.

    Together, we will address your specific post-COVID symptoms and create an individualized treatment plan for your road to recovery. During care, you will learn ways to pace yourself throughout the day and move your body so that you don’t tire so quickly.

    As part of your treatment, we will track your vital signs and symptoms to ensure your safety and progress. We will be there every step of the way back to a healthier you.

    You deserve a medical professional who understands you. If you’re tired of feeling alone in your recovery from long COVID, let a physical therapist help.

    Schedule a consultation with a physical therapist trained in treating long COVID. Click the blue Contact Us button below to request an appointment at a center near you today.

    By: Corey Malone, P.T., DPT, OCS. Corey is physical therapist, center director and Recovery and Reconditioning program champion with KORT in Kentucky.

    KORT is part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.


  • man with osteoarthritis in his knee

    Posted on 10/25/2021

    Did you know that knee osteoarthritis affects nearly 14 million adults in the United States1 per year? Or that meniscus tears are present in 60-90%1 of those with knee osteoarthritis? With symptoms ranging from knee pain, swelling, stiffness and limited range of motion, medication, injections, surgery and physical therapy are all commonly prescribed to manage knee pain. Medication and injections, however, may simply serve to mask your pain. Surgery can be costly and taxing on your body. Physical therapy, on the other hand, emphasizes a more holistic approach to the body with emphasis on education, pain management and strength and conditioning.

    At first glance, it can be frustrating when you are referred to physical therapy for management of knee pain related to structural issues like osteoarthritis or a knee joint tear. Is the physical therapist going to magically reverse your arthritis or heal your meniscus? Shouldn’t you address the structural problem head-on instead of just “strengthening around it?”

    Not necessarily.

    Surgery or osteoarthritis physical therapy?

    If we dig deeper, a better question to consider might be, “Do I need to change the structure of my knee in order to resume the activities I enjoy?” There are several studies to suggest that abnormal findings on X-rays and MRIs can be common, even in persons without knee pain. In fact, a 2020 study2 of a population with a median age of 44 and no knee pain found that an astounding 97% of knees had abnormalities on MRI. In addition, when comparing physical therapy management to surgical intervention, there are many cases with similar outcomes.

    Now, this is not to say that everyone with knee pain should get physical therapy instead of surgery. Sometimes, surgery is exactly what’s needed to improve your overall quality of life. However, including a physical therapist on your health care team – before and after surgery – is beneficial, even without changing the structural abnormalities that are often presumed to be the problem.

    If physical therapy isn’t changing the “structural problem,” what exactly is the benefit?

    People are more than pictures, and pain is far more complicated than what that picture shows. X-ray and MRI findings can absolutely be helpful in developing a plan of care; however, they are only one piece of the puzzle. While physical therapy is unlikely to result in a change in the X-ray or MRI findings, it can identify and help modify factors contributing to your knee pain and functional limitations.

    Focusing on your unique condition, a physical therapist can work with you to determine the following:

    • Health and lifestyle factors contributing to your knee pain
    • Activity modification so you can safely perform activities of daily living
    • Stretches and strategies to improve motion and strength
    • Swelling and pain control
    • How and when to appropriately get back to activities that cause you pain/discomfort

    This combination can help patients to better understand their condition and develop a plan that assists in recovery. Doing all of this may greatly enhance your quality of life and ease the pain and symptoms you are currently experiencing.

    Now, if you and your doctor determine that knee surgery is necessary, remember, physical therapy is a vital part of preparing for your procedure and recovering after it. Before surgery, we will work together to get you as healthy and strong as possible, which will enable your post-surgical recovery to be that much more successful and faster. Following surgery, we will focus on helping you to restore your strength, balance and flexibility.

    No matter what, physical therapists are committed to helping you be as mobile, independent and pain-free as possible. Our goal is to build a relationship in which you feel comfortable asking us questions, are an active partner in your care and we’re able to work together to ensure the best outcomes possible.

    If you have knee pain, contact us today and experience the power of physical therapy.

    References:

    1. Bhushan R. Deshpande, BS, Jeffrey N. Katz, MD, MSc, Daniel H. Solomon, MD, MPH, Edward H. Yelin, PhD, David J. Hunter, MBBS, PhD, Stephen P. Messier, PhD, Lisa G. Suter, MD, and Elena Losina, PhD. The number of persons with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in the United States: Impact of race/ethnicity, age, sex, and obesity (2017)
    2. Horga, L.M., Hirschmann, A.C., Henckel, J. et al. Prevalence of abnormal findings in 230 knees of asymptomatic adults using 3.0 T MRI. Skeletal Radiol (2020)

    By: Patrick Smith, P.T., DPT. Patrick is board-certified clinical specialist in sports physical and orthopedic physical therapy, a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists and a treating physical therapist with NovaCare Rehabilitation in Philadelphia, PA.

    KORT and NovaCare are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.

     


  • Posted on 10/18/2021

    Technology has brought many wonderful things to our fingertips. However, an undue side effect of all this technology and connectivity is a condition known as tech neck.

    If you have a stiff neck, experience headaches or feel frequent muscle tension around your neck and shoulders, your technology-using habits are likely a contributing factor. Physical therapy exercises can help to alleviate your pain.

    Many suffer unnecessary pain due to poor posture when using a computer, tablet or smartphone. Poor posture greatly increases the amount of pressure placed on your muscles. Sitting straight up, the weight of your head is 10-12 pounds. Slouching forward with head dropped down, the weight of your head is more like 50-60 pounds to your neck. It’s easy to understand why your muscles are hurting when you imagine them supporting five times more weight for several hours each day.

    If you’re suffering from tech neck, the good news is that it’s often reversible and treatable. Here are five strengthening and stretching exercises to combat it:

    Chin retraction

    You may often find yourself sitting slouched forward with your head well in front of your shoulders. This is the starting position for retracting your head.

    Pull your chin backward while looking directly forward. You should feel a “double-chin” forming under your jaw. Repeat this forward/backward exercise 10 times once every hour or two while working.

    Perform this daily while sitting at your work space.

    Trap stretch

    What about neck exercises for computer or laptop users? Tension in the upper trapezius muscles, which span the back of the neck and shoulders and are responsible for moving the head and shoulder blade, is common. The trap stretch can be performed any time, and you only need 20-30 seconds to help release tension on one side of your neck.

    To stretch the right side, place your right hand on your waist or lower back, tilt your head to the left while looking back to the right. Place your left hand on top of your head and gently pull toward the left until you feel a comfortable stretch. Hold this stretch for as long as 60 seconds and repeat on the other side.

    Perform this daily while sitting at your work space.

    Thoracic extension

    Lean forward in your chair as if you’re smashing a pillow between your belly and thighs. Place your hands with fingers crossed behind your head.

    Reach your elbows toward the ceiling while keeping your belly close to your thighs, causing only your upper back to straighten. The thoracic extension reverses the forward bend and slouchy posture so many assume throughout the workday.

    Perform this daily while sitting at your work space.

    Prone retraction

    Lie face down on the floor with your arms at your side, hands near the hips.

    Keep your neck straight (do not look upward) and simultaneously lift your chin, arms and knees off the ground. Hold the position for 2-3 seconds and release to the floor. Repeat 10 times for three sets.

    Perform this exercise  2-3 days each week to promote strengthening of the muscles across the back of your neck, shoulders and torso.

    Prone scaption

    Lie face down on the floor with your arms reaching upward and slightly outward from your head.

    Keep your neck straight and simultaneously lift your chin, arms and knees off the ground. Hold the position for 2-3 seconds and release to the floor. Repeat 10 times for three sets.

    This exercise emphasizes the lower trapezius muscle between your shoulder blades due to the overhead arm position. The prone scaption should be performed 2-3 days each week to promote strengthening of the muscles across the back of your neck, shoulders and torso.

    Finally, sit up straight. It’s not a complicated tip, but it is easy to forget that we need to maintain good posture when working with technology. Elevate your computer screen so that it is at eye level. If you’re working on a laptop, generally you’ll have to direct your gaze downward while keeping your posture upright, but do your best to comfortably elevate the computer. If you’re on a phone/tablet, simply make an effort to hold the device higher in front of your face.

    If you have pain that persists and is impacting your daily activities, contact us today to request an appointment with a licensed physical therapist. A physical therapy plan of care can efficiently and effectively strengthen your body, reduce pain and prevent injury.

    By: Joe Zucco, P.T., DPT, FAAOMPT, center manager for Select Physical Therapy in Sarasota, FL.

    Select Physical Therapy and KORT are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.

     


  • Posted on 10/1/2021

    At KORT, we believe movement is medicine. So, what moves you? Physical activity is key to good health, vitality, energy, strength and might even make you laugh more.

    If pain or a medical condition is holding you back, we’re here to help. Physical therapy is a moving experience.

    Physical therapy gets you back to life and the things that are most important to you. Whether it’s running a marathon, playing with the grandkids or simply cooking dinner pain-free, the benefits of physical therapy can change lives for the better.

    That’s why we’re excited it is October, one of our favorite months of the year. Why, you may ask? October is National Physical Therapy Month. For 31 days, we get to celebrate all things physical therapy and the many ways our dedicated physical therapists and physical therapist assistants help improve the quality of life.

    There is so much to share about the benefits of physical therapy, including the highly-trained clinicians who provide it. Did you know that physical therapy helps people manage pain and chronic conditions? How about the power of physical therapy to help heal from recent injury and reduce the risk of future injury? Or prepare the body for surgery and successful recovery or avoid the need for surgery altogether? Well, physical therapy does all this and more.

    Physical therapy is also a safe alternative to taking prescription medication. It treats common aches and strains, sprains and fractures, and helps with many other issues and conditions, including:

    • Back sprain/strain
    • COVID-19 fatigue and other debilitating illnesses
    • Headaches and concussions
    • Vertigo, dizziness and balance
    • Disc injury and pinched nerves
    • Rotator cuff tear, bursitis and frozen shoulder…and more

    So, what moves you? That marathon? Those grandkids? That culinary masterpiece? Whatever it is, physical therapy, and our compassionate team of licensed therapists, can help get you moving.

    Request an appointment today and see how physical therapy can physically, emotionally and mentally enrich your life.

    #ThePowerOfPhysicalTherapy #WhatMovesYou #ChoosePT

     


  • high school female volleyball team preparing

    Posted on 9/22/2021

    Sports and exercise are part of the lives of many young individuals. Typically, people who participate in sports are known to be healthier and less likely to partake in outside negative distractions compared to people who do not play sports. However, for some adolescent girls, when they only focus on the sport and not their bodies, consequences can arise. 
    Many girls who participate in sports are at risk for an issue called the female athlete triad. This triad consists of three conditions, and the athlete can have one, two or all three. The three conditions include disordered eating, amenorrhea and osteoporosis.

    Disordered eating

    Disordered eating is a term that refers to an individual having unhealthy eating behaviors and worrying about body image. Some of the most common forms of disordered eating include extreme dieting and restrictive eating. On the top end of the spectrum are eating disorders, which involve things such as self-induced vomiting, binge eating and laxative abuse. An individual can have disordered eating and not be diagnosed with an eating disorder. Most girls with disordered eating are trying to lose weight to help them improve their athletic performance. For these specific athletes, this eating pattern can range from not eating enough calories to sustain the amount of activity that they are participating in, to trying to avoid “bad” foods, all the way to eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Amenorrhea

    Amenorrhea is the lack of menstruation, or one or more missed menstrual periods. Women who have missed at least three menstrual periods in a row have amenorrhea, as well as girls who have not started their periods by the age of 15. Intense exercise accompanied with not eating enough calories can lead to a decrease in the hormones needed for menstruation. As a result, a girl’s period may never come, become irregular or stop altogether. Some girls who have been participating in sports since a young age may never get their first period, because they have been training so hard. On the other hand, some girls may have gotten their period, but it disappears as their training intensifies or their eating habits change. On one hand, dysfunction of the menstrual cycle can lead to infertility. And on the other hand, it can lead to unplanned pregnancies in young women recovering from the triad. While the cycle is being restored, an egg may be dropped early and, without contraception, pregnancy can occur.

    Osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis is translated as porous bone. It is a disease in which the density and quality of the bone are reduced. For people with osteoporosis, boss loss overtakes the growth of new bone. Consequently, over time the bone becomes more porous and fragile, and the risk of fracture greatly increases. This typically happens silently, and there are usually no symptoms until the first fracture occurs. In girls with the triad, estrogen is typically lower. Low estrogen accompanied with a poor diet, especially low calcium, can lead to osteoporosis. During the teen years, a lot of bone growth is supposed to happen and the peak bone mass should be reached. An athlete with the female athlete triad will have a hard time getting to her peak bone mass, and it can affect her greatly later in life.

    Takeaway: Diagnosing and treatment

    Girls who have female athlete triad are typically invested in their sports and would do almost anything to be the best athlete possible. Girls in particular sports have more of a risk than others. Sports with a weight class like wrestling, martial arts and rowing, and sports where being thin is more optimal for performing like gymnastics, diving, figure skating, cross country and ballet, have a higher risk. However, the truth is, being very thin, and losing those last few pounds, doesn’t typically improve performance at all.

    If a female athlete is suspected to have the triad, a wide-ranging physical examination is needed for diagnosis. A doctor will likely ask questions about her period, diet, exercise habits and overall feelings about her body. From there, blood test will be ordered to check for vitamin deficiencies and to rule out any other reasons for a lack of period and weight loss. A doctor may also order a bone scan to check for osteoporosis, since the athlete will be at a higher risk for bone breaks.

    Doctors will not work alone to help treat a girl with female athlete triad. Coaches, athletic trainers, parents, physical therapists, nutritionists and dietitians and mental health specialists all work together and play a role in the recovery of this athlete. They focus on both the physical and emotional issues that the girl is likely facing to help prevent long term issues.

    References:

    By: Wyneisha Mason, MAT, ATC. ‘Neisha is an athletic trainer with RUSH Physical Therapy in Chicago, Illinois.

    RUSH and KORT are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.

     


  • illustration of glute medius and glute minimus

    Posted on 8/11/2021

    Recently, I had a runner try to increase their pace by 30 seconds from one weekend to the next. The result? Severe pain along the inside of their shin and the start of spending two days a week in physical therapy.

    Many running injuries are due to overuse and/or improper training. Up to 70% of recreational and competitive distance runners sustain an overuse running injury during any one-year period.1 One of my favorite questions to ask runners is, “Other than running, what exercises are you doing?” Usually the response is, “You mean running isn’t enough exercise?”

    Running injuries can be prevented. One of the keys to proper training is cross training. The most important group of muscles to strengthen for runners are those along the side of your hip, mainly your glute medius and glute minimus.

    When people hear glutes, they immediately think of their buttocks. But, two of the smaller glute muscles – the glute medius and minimus – are often overlooked. The glute medius and minimus are vital hip muscles and their main function is to stabilize your pelvis.

    When you’re walking, think about the moment you put your right foot down and swing your left leg through. Does your left hip drop down? If so, then you may have some weakness in these stabilizers along your right side. Now, imagine running more than five miles and this is repetitively happening without you knowing. Imagine the wear and tear this is taking on your body. Weak hips place unnecessary stress along your back, knees and feet. The good news is that this can be prevented.

    How do you strengthen your glutes? Here are some simple exercises that do not require much equipment.

    • Sidestepping: Place a resistance band just above your knees (easier) or above your ankles (harder). Keeping your toes pointing forward, side-step in a mini squat about 20 feet. Then, return to the start without turning around.
    • Jane Fondas: Lay on your left side completely against the wall, head, back and heels. Place a towel behind your right heel and keeping your toes pointing straight forward. Slowly lift your leg up/down. Repeat on other side.
    • Side planks: These can be done from your knees or feet.
    • Knee side plank: Slowly bring your buttocks back then forward to target multiple fibers of the muscle.
    • Hydrants: On all fours, lift your knee out to the side without letting your hips tilt.

    glute exercises

    For more information or to request a complimentary injury screen with one of our licensed physical therapists, please contact the center nearest you today. In the meantime, train smart, run fast and run happy!

    By: Sarah Zayyad, DPT, CMPT, CDNT, Cert-ART, physical therapist with RUSH Physical Therapy 

    RUSH Physical Therapy and KORT are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.

    1:  Ferber, R., Hreljac, A., & Kendall, K. D. (2009). Suspected Mechanisms in the Cause of Overuse Running Injuries: A Clinical Review. Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach, 1(3), 242–246. https://doi.org/10.1177/1941738109334272 


  • Posted on 7/8/2021

    Select Medical, KORT's parent company, was proud to collaborate with the CDC on an important clinical study regarding the long-term impact of COVID-19. The study validates our Recovery and Reconditioning Program to focus on specific deficits in patients recovering from COVID-19 and other debilitating illnesses and conditions.

    Findings of the study indicate that patients recovering from COVID-19 could benefit from additional personalized rehabilitation services aimed at both physical and mental health. As the nation’s largest provider of outcomes-based, innovative physical therapy, Select Medical, along with KORT, is expertly positioned to guide the recovery of this 33.5 million patient population.

    The Recovery and Reconditioning program launched in June 2020 amid the pandemic and was developed in partnership with leading physicians, including physiatrists, pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists as well as physical and occupational therapists and speech-language pathologists. Following evidence-informed program guidelines, our licensed physical and occupational therapists tailor a plan of care to address patients’ specific needs and goals to resume pre-COVID activities and routine.

    KORT centers are “direct access” and do not require a physician referral to receive care. If you or a loved one are recovering from COVID-19, please click here to find a center near you and schedule an appointment today.

     


  • Posted on 6/28/2021

    Whether you’re new to the sport of triathlon or jumping back in after a longer break in racing, many are excited to drop any weight gained during the past year. It’s the perfect time of year to get outside and back to racing.

    While triathlons are a great way to push our bodies and are relatively safe for individuals at any age, athletic background or ability level, participants also need to be aware of the:

    • Pitfalls of overtraining
    • Importance of rest
    • Appropriate time to take some time off

    What defines rest and why is it important?

    Rest comes in many forms. It can be as simple as the time between repetitions, intervals or sets or a scheduled day off in your training plan. And, it can be skipping a workout when you are tired and feeling worn down, physically or mentally.

    If you sustain an injury or have an illness, rest may mean prolonged time away. However, rest doesn’t mean you have to completely stop all activity. You can take time off from typical training to work on mobility, participate in a yoga class, go for a walk, spend extra time on nutrition or enjoy a hot bath and relax.

    Whether planned or forced, rest allows the body to adapt to the stressors and changes in demand being placed on it. It allows muscles to recover and gain strength, our nervous system to adapt to changes and regenerate and our body to replenish our energy stores. Rest ultimately decreases the risk of overtraining, overtraining syndrome and overuse injuries.

    Triathlon training naturally allows our muscle groups to get some rest. When training in one discipline, the muscles involved in the other disciplines naturally get some time off. Spending the day in the pool gives your body a break from the repetitive pounding on the pavement from running, and with cycling or spinning, your shoulders get some needed time off from the resistance of the water.

    When is it time to take off, skip a workout and push training to another day?

    What are the signs of needing a break?

    As you dive into your training plan and are weeks out from the year’s first event, here are some important signs and symptoms that your body is telling you to take a break:

    • You are suffering through workouts that were previously done with ease
    • Notice your form is deteriorating or you are slower in any of your disciplines
    • It is harder to wake up
    • Increased irritability
    • Decreased motivation to train or in your daily life
    • Decreased concentration during work-outs
    • Increased sleeping
    • More frequent soreness or injuries (and it’s not due to an increase in intensity level of working out)
    • Increased illness

    If we don’t listen to these signs, our bodies may just force us to rest. If this happens, we can end up overtraining or sidelined with an injury.

    What is overtraining?

    Overtraining, simply put, is doing more than your body can handle at any given time. There is an imbalance between training, nutrition and rest leading to a decrease in performance, increase in fatigue and a decline in mood. For a well-trained athlete, overtraining may occur when putting in extra training sessions on an already full schedule. If you’re a rookie, it might mean jumping in too quickly with one or two extra days of training.

    Overtraining can be influenced by outside workload when we are stretching our personal schedules and sleep routines too thin. You may see you are underperforming with little to no change in your training program. Or, you may find you have more difficulty sleeping - falling asleep or staying asleep despite fatigue from working out.

    Once this stage or overtraining is reached, athletes will often find an elevated heart rate, especially first thing in the morning as well as deficiencies in vitamins B12 or D, lower iron levels and increase in creatine kinase levels in the blood. All of these can be serious signs of overtraining syndrome and can force an athlete into three-to-eight weeks off from training and treatment by a medical professional.

    What are overuse injuries?

    The most common overuse injuries in triathletes and athletes in general are from overtraining or overuse. Overuse injuries represent the largest percentage of sports-related injuries that require medical attention and are most common in runners and endurance athletes (triathletes).

    Approximately 50-70% of triathlete injuries occur when running, and the majority of those are overuse. These injuries most often occur in the knee, Achilles, foot or back or the shoulder from swimming. They can occur due to a breakdown in tissue that doesn’t have adequate time to repair itself before more use.

    If you are seeing aches and pains that don’t subside in approximately three days in the well-trained athlete or seven days in a new participant (due to new muscles being trained,) it is time to take some time off and seek out your local physical therapist for guidance. A physical therapy plan of care can help you heal, regain/increase strength and flexibility and reduce pain. It can also help you prevent future injury and optimize your sports performance.

    Author: Melissa Bryant, P.T. Melissa serves as the center manager for Select Physical Therapy’s Colorado Springs facility, located in the USA Triathlon headquarters building.

    Select Physical Therapy and KORT are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.

    Resources

    • Vleck, V., & Alves, F. B. (2011). TRiathlon injury review. British journal of sports medicine, 45(4), 382-383.
    • Koutedakis, Y., Budgett, R., & Faulmann, L. (1990). Rest in underperforming elite competitors. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 24(4), 248-252.
    • Gosling, C. M., Forbes, A. B., McGivern, J., & Gabbe, B. J. (2010). A profile of injuries in athletes seeking treatment during a triathlon race series. The American journal of sports medicine, 38(5), 1007-1014.
    • Budgett, R. (1990). Overtraining syndrome. British journal of sports medicine, 24(4), 231-236.
    • O'Toole, M. L., Hiller, W. D. B., Smith, R. A., & Sisk, T. D. (1989). Overuse injuries in ultraendurance triathietes. The American journal of sports medicine, 17(4), 514-518.
    • Collins, K., Wagner, M., Peterson, K., & Storey, M. (1989). Overuse injuries in triathletes: a study of the 1986 Seafair Triathlon. The American journal of sports medicine, 17(5), 675-680.